Check out this wonderful Black genealogy program

Black Homesteaders of the South with Bernice A. Bennett

On Saturday, February 4, 2023, 12 – 1:30 PM, the African American History and Culture Museum will host its African American History and Culture Event.

It will be held on the Concourse, Oprah Winfrey Theater + streaming

It’s free. It’s also recommended that you get tickets or register at www.etix.com.

Join genealogist Bernice A. Bennett who will uncover the stories of African American families who became landowners through the Homestead Act of 1862 from her latest book Black Homesteaders of the South. Bennett’s work is a modern story of black genealogists who networked through a Facebook page to trace the footsteps of their ancestors in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Louisiana & Mississippi. Find out how these families navigated the application process through the federal government, and what this legacy means for their descendants today.
Bernice Alexander Bennett is an award-winning author, genealogist and host of Research at the NationaArchives & Beyond BlogTalkRadio program. Her genealogical interests focus on Southeast Louisiana and Edgefield and Greenwood Counties, South Carolina. Bennett is an author and contributor to 2 award winning genealogy books including Our Ancestors, Our Stories and Tracing Their Steps: A Memoir. A New Orleans native, Bennett is a volunteer with the Homestead National Historical Park Service identifying descendants of Black homesteaders to share their stories.
Black Homesteaders of the South with Bernice A. Bennett

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MONDAY MAY 30, 2022I STAND ON THE SHOULDERS OF MY ANCESTORSYour connection to your ancestors is the shortest path to God. Whatever your connection to your ancestors is- whether it is a heart connection or whether it is a distant memory- they are a part of you. And you are a part of them. Your connection with them transcends lost stories, names, and pictures. You are here because of them, and their soul lives in your heart, bones, and flesh. I stand on the shoulders of my ancestors. I know that whether I know their stories or not, I am connected to them. We are bound together by a divine web of life. I call on them every day. I call on my biological ancestors, as well as my spiritual ancestors. My connection with my ancestors gives me life. It is my foundation. Thank you, Power, in me, through me, as me, around me, through the Christ within. And so it is.Honor your father and your mother,that your days may be long upon the landwhich the Lord your God gives you.Exodus 20:12Daily Thoughts from the HillCopyright: Hillside International Truth Center, Inc.Bishop Dr. Jack L. Bomar – Executive BishopBishop Dr. Barbara L. King – Founder

From the resting place of Clark Atlanta University’s first president, Dr. Thomas Cole, Jr., to ancestors of other families, to relics of our past, our history is never forgotten.

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Documenting the Boyhood Hometown of a Legendary Jazz Musician

A recent visit to East St. Louis, I’ll., yielded highs and lows.

Jazz musician ancestor Miles Davis grew up in the deep South…that is, southern Illinois. Nearby Davis’ boyhood home are stark images of ravaged homes such as this one I captured while riding in the back seat of a SUV.

What are you capturing? Anywhere you are, I’m sure famous folk have walked those same streets. Research. Record. Reward your genealogy work.

Somewhere in East St. Louis, IL. April 2022

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Create your great today for tomorrow

How to tips

Live your best lives and record your stories. We have a limited amount of time in this earth realm. How are you preparing to leave lasting legacies? Keep in mind our future generations. Namaste.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 2022 I AM HERE FOR THE GLORY OF GOD

You are here to change the world. Future generations will reap the harvest of your good works. Shine and shine brightly — excerpt Daily Thoughts from the Hill daily_thoughts_from_the_hill@hillsideinternational.org.


How to preserve great legacies

  • Create a print, audio and/or video gratitude journal and strive to record your successes, victories, small wonders and more in it each day. If you already have a gratitude, continue to record.
  • If you have or are creating a print gratitude journal, add photos and if possible, audio and video evidence of the good you are enjoying.
  • On those so-called “sad” or “bad” days, dig deep and find at least one object, person or situation that brought sunshine to your lives.
  • Consider presenting excerpts from your gratitude journal in a family or friends setting such as a reunion, holiday or just because.
  • Consider where you will place your gratitude journal so that future generations may view it. Online ancestry sites and other technology-based cloud storage locations are worth exploring.

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#36 Go Back: Find a piece of history by taking a piece of advice

The most valuable piece of advice that I received when I was new to the family genealogy research, was to return the search process and review the same documents that I had earlier discovered.

Just days ago, I reviewed the information on my ancestors – again – I found new information about my ancestors. My breaks can be attributed to the ancestry.com’s ThruLines™ . This service is available to everyone with completed DNA results. Some 10 years ago or so when the DNA tests were first available to females, I jumped at the chance to get my results based on my desire to locate my ancestors. It continues to pay dividends today as records are constantly updated

She is listed as my 4th great grandmother born Oct. 11, 1806, in South Carolina and who died on Feb. 20, 1892 in Saline County, Arkansas.

What’s striking is how grandma is spelled on Great-Great-Great-Great Grandmother Elizabeth Jane Hardman Hayes tombstone. Also, I love the designation of the days and moths that she lived her life. It honors the great Elizabeth J. Wade Hardman Hayes.

For a couple of years, I celebrated that I located my 4th Great Grandmother. Now there is more: I just located her father, mother, siblings and her spouses, thanks to ThruLines™.

I found my 5th Great Grandfather! – Maybe

Notice the inscription that details Robert Henly Courts Wade being among the first white settlers in DeKalb County, Georgia where he claimed his family’s homestead in 1829.

Update: Friday, Oct. 8, 2021: With ancestry.com, we are examining whether this linkage is indeed my 5th GreatGrandfather. Stay tuned as these twists and turns are natural in the genealogy search for our relatives.

Thanks to the ancestry.com additional genealogy research tool, ThruLines™, I was able to work through the hints complete with a grave marker and public trees from others researching the same man. It provided this public path to find my common ancestors who seemingly were hiding in the piles of research materials.  and private paths to my common ancestors. It is a huge help in narrowing down who is and isn’t potentially related to me. The ancestors whose profiles are not public via others who are searching for their loved ones, are only listed, yet additional information about those deemed “private” is not provided. That is still a big help as I am seeking to match names, dates, relationships, locations and other hints to gain full access to the great people who walked this earth before me.

Guess what? These ancestors are buried in a private family cemetery, Wade Cemetery, just a few miles from my current home (Ann) in DeKalb County, Georgia. I will share more in future writings.

Five generations from Robert Henly Courts Wade to Ann Lineve Wead Kimbrough

To learn more about the exciting, step-by-step findings about our maternal ancestors who are listed as “white, Mulatto, yellow and Colored,” check out the Good Genes Genealogy Services’ e-book for November 2021. In the meantime, check out, like and follow our tweets, @GoodGensGen, @goodgenesgenealogy on WordPress and fb @goodgenesgenealogy.

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#34 How to research the “Grand” legacies

In honor of Grandparents Day, consider digging a little deeper to gain those important nuggets from the family tree.

Honor your ancestral grandparents by researching your family’s histories. Begin with the most sacred and lasting technique in African American, Afro Caribbean, Native American and other cultures’ and that is storytelling.

Here are a few tips:

  1. Communicate with a grandparent — whether yours or another family’s relative.
  2. Ask questions about their childhood and things that they remember.
  3. With their permission, record their words and great stories.
  4. Share their stories. Embed it in your psyche. Honor the grandparents for what they accomplished.
  5. Appreciate their lives.
Photo by Harshi Rateria on Pexels.com
SATURDAY          SEPTEMBER 11, 2021 THANK GOD FOR GRANDPARENTS 
A Daily Thought from the Hill (Hillside International Truth Center, Atlanta, GA)
Grandparents are exactly that- grand. They are known by many names. Grandmothers are called nana, grammy, big mama, or abuela, while grandfathers are called grandpa, pop-pop, granddaddy, or abeulo, to name a few. Whatever name we call our grandparents and whether we had or have a relationship with them or not, they are part of the unbroken spiral of life. Their soul is imprinted on our soul. We are one with them.       I honor, acknowledge, and celebrate my grandparents. I recognize their role in my being here to express my inner splendor. I pray for and bless all grandparents wherever they are, in spirit or in the flesh. Thank you for your ability to impart wisdom to navigate life’s lessons. For the grandparents who are challenged to show up, we shine the light of love on you. Thank you, Order, in me, through me, as me, around me, through the Christ within. And so it is.     

Children’s children are the crowns of old men; and the glory of children is their fathers.  Proverbs 17:6    
 Daily Thoughts from the HillCopyright: Hillside International Truth Center, Inc.Bishop Dr. Jack L. Bomar – Executive BishopBishop Dr. Barbara L. King – Founder

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I Learn from My Experiences

As genealogists on all levels — beginners who are researching family histories to the veterans/professionals — we have to learn from our ancestors’ experiences. In your reading of this wonderful meditation from the Hillside International Truth Center , replace the words “past experiences” and “past” and “experiences” with the word s “ancestral history … healing.”

FRIDAY, AUGUST 20, 2021
       Our past experiences provide opportunities for us to learn and grow. Yet, we often push them away to the farthest part of our minds. We focus so much energy on trying to forget the past, that we draw those experiences back into our life. In Truth, we know that what we focus on, we draw to us.
       I stop denying my past experiences. I learn from these experiences. And with God’s guidance, I allow them to assist me in creating more harmonious experiences. My experiences do not have control over me. I have control over them.
I appreciate the lessons from my past. I do not allow them to hold me hostage. I use them to reconnect with Source energy. I learn the lesson. And I move on to other experiences that are aligned with my new spiritual awareness. Thank you, Will, in me, through me, as me, around me, through the Christ within. And so it is. For thou art my strength and my refuge;
therefore for thy name’s sake comfort me and guide me.

Psalm 31:3
 
 Daily Thoughts from the HillCopyright: Hillside International Truth Center, Inc.Bishop Dr. Jack L. Bomar – Executive BishopBishop Dr. Barbara L. King – Founder

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